Skip to main content

It's the Theology

We live in the UK and in recent years there has been an increase in acts of violence carried out by some who act in the name of Islam. Usually there is shock and fear followed by people trying to calm the situation by reminding the public that most Muslims in the UK are moderate and not violent. It’s understandable that in such an environment, anyone who critiques Islamic theology may be seen as one who is attempting to stir up social fires. Some resent what they see as politically correct jellyfishing and lambast Islam – and the whole Muslim community – along with it in response.

Let’s understand our priorities. It is understandable that secular people – whose joy is in this world – fear radical Islam. For those of us whose life is hidden with Christ in eternity, such fear is unnecessary though we still may feel it at times. Terrorists make death more unpredictable and take our loved ones at unexpected times. But the ultimate tragedy of humanity is not that we lose loved ones when we least expect it – it’s that we lose them in the first place. The goodbye we must one day make to all our loved ones is inevitable.

It's debated between radical and moderate Muslims to what degree the Qu'ran encourages violence towards 'infidels'. This is because some verses are peaceful and some are violent in nature. But unlike the Bible, narrative context is not always clearly given to verses so it can be confusing to know which ones are applicable in which situations. Some believe that Mohammed’s later verses abrogate his earlier, more violent verses. But even this is debated. 

Theology

But it's definite that the Qu'ran denies the hope of Christ's resurrection. Islam teaches that Jesus (Isa) was a mere prophet who was never crucified and who therefore never rose with saving power from death. This is why we must give ourselves to proclaiming the resurrection of Christ with fresh boldness and compassion. It's Christ alone that can save. If you have him, you no longer wet yourself at the thought of being murdered by a terrorist.

We should be concerned about the veils of both Western secularism and Islam. They both blind the people around me. The disease of sin is killing them and neither ideology can save from death or hell. And for this reason, I am more troubled by Islamic theology than by Islamic terrorism. Islam preaches a different Jesus. This Jesus did not die for sins, did not rise from the grave, and does not save us or make God our Father. Islam does not teach that we need new hearts or that we can be born again. They teach that we must simply choose to submit to the commands of Allah and hope on judgement day he has mercy on us. Sin is not a sickness in Islam, and therefore there is no need of the Cross as a cure.

Muslims need to hear good news. A Messiah has come. He is the only one who has perfectly submitted to the will of Allah and fulfilled all the commands – and he did it on our behalf. Muslims have no assurance of eternal life. Their salvation is based on their performance. If you are a Christian you should never fear a Muslim – regardless of how radicalised they may be. You have what they need.

Islamic theology is far more dangerous than a few explosions. And so is any ideology – secular or religious – that blinds people from the person and work of Jesus. Yes, the bombs can be troublesome. But the book is worse. 

Comments

  1. You shouldn't be writing about the Qur'an if you think it has no context ...

    ReplyDelete
  2. You can read my Qur'an blog for an alternative view https://medium.com/@julianbond12/the-opening-surah-1-d3dec1e945f5

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Dear Pro-Gay Christian Friend

[Response to the letter Dear Non-Affirming Christian]
Dear Pro-Gay Christian Friend,
Thank you for taking the time to write me. Sadly, it seems you misunderstand why I met with you for coffee. Please let me explain my motives by defining the words in my salutation above. Would this be too terrible a way to go about it?
Let’s start with ‘friend’ shall we? You rightly question this term as an accurate description of our relationship. For now, let's simply say I mean it as an expression of good will - but will return to it again at the end of the letter. Then there's this term, 'pro-gay'. By this, I don't mean your personal sexual urges. There have historically been – and are today – countless godly leaders in the church who have deep sexual and romantic attractions to people of the same gender. In spite of their desires, they remain celibate and teach orthodox views of gender and sexuality. In your letter, you repeatedly refer to me as a ‘non-affirming Christian’, but I …

Where I Turn Down a Gay 'Wedding' Invitation

Dear Katie,
I hope this letter finds you well. You’ve been on my mind lately as it’s been a few weeks since we’ve met up. We’re overdue to grab a coffee – I hope we can soon. I also want to thank you for thinking of me as you sent out invitations for what I know will be a big day for you and Joanna. I’ve known you since before you met her (two years ago now, is it?) and I appreciate all you’ve shared with me about how meaningful that relationship is to you. It was especially kind of you given my Christian faith. You've never directly asked me my views on gender or sex in much detail. But I think our conversations must have touched on it enough times to at least make you a bit unsure of my reaction when you sent the invitation. I have to say 'no' to your kind invitation. You know that I care for you and that I value our friendship. You know I don't reject you because you are gay. So, would it be too much to ask of you if I explain why my faith would make attendance at your…

Driscoll Returns, ‘Christian Today’ Melts.

Sometimes in the course of events, a peculiar thing happens that then triggers a response more peculiar still. This is what we now see with the return of Pastor Mark Driscoll to the church scene.
For those unfamiliar with the drama, Mark Driscoll was a church planter and Bible teacher who made a big impact in the least churched city in the USA: Seattle. Thousands professed faith in Christ through his ministry. But he left the church that he had started under dark circumstances. No, it wasn’t adultery as is so often the case with some of these big-name preachers. Rather, it was heavy-handed leadership―resulting in many spiritually crushed church members―that drove him to resign.
Now, three years later, he is leading a new church and many are downloading his sermons once again. This is not without some valid controversy―for reasons we’ll mention soon. But what is most noticeable is not his peculiar return. It is the reaction among those who lean left of classical Christian teaching: the …