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Stand before the King


‘As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand’  -1 Kings 17.1


We all stand before someone or something. We wake up each morning with a circumstance or a person on our mind – a reference point that helps define who we are and how we act and react to the world around us. It’s something we want, something we love, or something we fear to lose.

Elijah was physically standing before the throne of Ahab, the most powerful man in his country. This King commanded armies and possessed the authority to have the prophet swiftly executed. Most of us would wet ourselves.

But Elijah wasn’t fazed. How? He had more than strong coffee flowing through him. His power came, not from what he drank, but what he saw. He had eyes of faith that had been cultivated by unseen hours spent in the secret place.

Elijah saw two thrones. He saw Ahab’s seat for what it was: a brief and fleeting thing. Beyond that, he saw the high and fiery throne that reigns forever unmoved in the granite halls of eternity. It was before that throne that Elijah had trembled in private – and now he could stand in public. Elijah was not unique among the men of God in this regard. It was by faith that Mordecai also stood before the wicked Haman when everyone else pleaded with him to bow.

The devil uses intimidation to silence the people of God. The phrase ‘keep your opinions to yourself’ may easily be what someone says when they do not wish to hear truth. If Jezebel cannot get you to celebrate her false teaching, she will seek to keep the children of God from prophesying his truth.

When we tremble before God, we can walk confidently before people. The more we bend the knee before the true king, the less influence bullies and manipulators will wield over us. If we are to stand and speak for God in our generation, we cannot fear what those around us fear. Our lives must be controlled by a divine fear that outstrips every earthly fear and leaves every earthly intimidation toothless. 

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